Fanali di Senetosa

Refuge

OPENING

The refuge is open from 29/06/2020 to 31/10/2020.
The rest of the year on reservation from 10 persons.

RATES

Room: €20 / pers / night

Dormitory: €15 / pers / night

Bivouac: €8 / pers / night

Breakfast: €6.50

Bed linen: €3 / pers

Tent rental: €7

Shower tokens: €3 / pers

Phare de Senetosa

A LITTLE ISLAND OF HUMAN ACTIVITY LOST IN THE HEART OF A VAST AREA OF WILD, UNSPOILT NATURE.

Located in the heart of the Senetosa Campomoro protected natural area and the property of the Conservatoire du Littoral (Coastal Conservatory), the lighthouse has became an original stopover for hikers along the 60 km of footpaths that the Conservatoire and Syndicat Elisa have developed between the hamlet of Campomoro to the north and Tizzano to the south. Its isolation, inaccessibility to motor vehicles and basic conditions of comfort make Senetosa refuge comparable to mountain refuges. As wilderness camping and bivouacs are prohibited throughout the protected area, hikers, horse trekkers and kayakers can now meet in this authentic stopover, to spend a maximum of one or two nights.

U Fanali di Senetosa welcomes its hikers:

  • In twin rooms (4x2 beds)
  • In dormitories (2x8 beds)
  • In the bivouac (40 places)

An equipped kitchen, 2 bathrooms, a refectory and pit toilets are available to visitors. Bed linen (or duvets) and tents are available for rental.

History

Senetosa lighthouse was built towards the end of the Corsican illumination programme. Designed by the engineer Zevaco, its construction followed the shipwreck of the Tasmania. Work began in 1889 and the lighthouse was first lit on 15 May 1892, with a white flashing light every 5 seconds. It marks the Sec des Moines and the west entrance to the Bouches de Bonifacio.
Originally powered by mineral oil, the fuel source was changed for petroleum vapour in 1906. The lighthouse was later electrified and automated in 1988.

Senetosa was one of the only remaining manned lighthouses in France at the beginning of the 21st century; its last two keepers left in 2008.
A small museum is accessible to the public inside the refuge.